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energy was spent on health care and other things coming into the question is do you see that -- how do you strike that balance and do you see that changing as you go forward into the next four years? >> to complicate your questions about what the balance in the short term and the immediate and long-term things that matter for the strength of the economy and i think it's important to recognize that as we get to the next phase of the fiscal reform debate you have to think about this not just about how you bring them down gradually to the point they are sustainable you to think about it in terms of what can you do to improve the long-term growth in the american economy? there are things we have to do in infrastructure and education just to name to that are important to the potential of the country and are not very expensive. if we sacrifice those objectives in the interest of getting more fiscal restraint more quickly than is desirable would do damage across the country, so i would just encourage people to look at -- we want to look at things that are good for growth now and over the long
to the committee on energy with instructions to report back the following amendment, number 2880. mr. reid: i ask for the yeas and nays on that motion. the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? there appears to be. the yeas and nays are ordered. mr. reid: i have an amendment to the instructions. that's also at the desk. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: the senator from nevada, mr. reid, proposes amendment numbered 2881 to the instructions on the motion to commit s. 3525. mr. reid: i ask for the yeas and nays on that amendment. the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? there appears to be. the yeas and nays are ordered. mr. reid: i have a second-degree amendment at the desk. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: the senator from nevada, mr. reid, proposes amendment numbered 2882 to amendment numbered 2881. mr. reid: i have a cloture motion on the bill that is already at the desk. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: cloture motion. we, the undersigned senators in accordance with the provisions of rule 22 of the st
with the fire wall strategy spending about half of the convention dollars in energy. the three fire walls deutsch of florida, ohio and virginia which aside from indiana and north carolina is more appointed to victories of 2008 were the lowest percentage stays for barack obama. they have to those states together have 60 electoral votes they would appear to have to be entered 32 electoral votes without them he would have 272 which would meet only one other state would have tipped. there is not a likely candidate as you look down the percentages in this election. but it was nonetheless close. and i think it is this proved to be effective if you carry committees currently carrying florida by 46,000 votes and by 107,000 virginia by 100,000. the two injured 53,000 votes margins are responsible for his big electoral vote margin. it is a classic example of a high-risk strategy. the obama strategist are now going to be healed with some appropriateness as berlin and for employing the strategy. if a few numbers turn out a little differently they might be excoriated, but the fact is that they succeed
and vote against the president? take a look at a place like oklahoma where energy state and you're supposed of conservatives are coming out in droves to vote against president obama. turnout looks to be down more than 5% and appears with almost all votes counted in oakland. a couple of wrong assumptions we made the overall this is a watershed election because with 84 house freshman in my count, 40 and democrats and 35 election. when you combine that with a few surviving members of the class of 2010, that's 166 members, more than one-third of the house will have less than three years of experience in congress takes office in january. so a huge new freshman class, very steep learning curve, and get ready for the fireworks. >> curtis. and again, you have, many of you have history port and the bbc's report on voter turnout. but tell us what happened and why spent the first and want to do is think dpc, and eric larson for making this report possible. wouldn't have been without them. i'm usually the chicken little of the analyst industry on the turnout, this time i was chicken little when it turn
energy. we need to renew that production tax credit. it's encouraged billions of dollars in investment and helped create tens of thousands of good-paying moobs across our country -- american jobs across our country. but i have to tell your our inaction here is jeopardizing the future of what's really a promising industry. we've literally over the last months seen wind industry jobs in the thousands disappear. that's not a statistic, not just a statement, those jobs affected real americans. and these job losses were completely preventible. and it's time for us to get back to work and extend the production tax credit so that our wind energy industry can also get back to work. and one of the things i've done, mr. president, i've come to the floor some 20-plus times, is focus on an individual state. i want today talk about a state that has incredible potential for wind power. and that's montana. the last best place as montanans like to describe their amazing state. and like almost every state in the country, montana's seen the jobs, clean energy and economic benefits of wind power. i want
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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